Korean short rib sandwich ssam

Short rib sandwich ssam

In a couple hours, I’ll be on my way to college. My orientation doesn’t actually start until Friday, but I’m going up there now because of a 4-day pre-orientation backpacking trip. Groups of ten students—eight incoming freshmen and two upperclassmen—can go on various different trips for meeting and greeting at its most basic form—in the wild. I signed up for the trip in Vermont, so we’ll be traversing various mountains, peaks, and densely wooded areas. My backpack is a bit more than half my size and probably weighs about half my weight. Still, I’m looking forward to the trip. After all, who doesn’t enjoy well-earned s’mores after hiking up 45 degree inclines and weathered trails?

After the trip, move-in day occurs immediately after and orientation starts, so I’m not sure when my next post will be. Hopefully, You’ll hear from me in two weeks or so!

However, I’m sure this recipe will tide you over. Crunchy, soft, refreshing, all mixed into one beautiful sandwich. Unlike traditional sandwiches, I forwent the bread in lieu of crisp romaine lettuce. Instead, this sandwich receives a small carb boost from the quinoa simmered in warm Korean BBQ marinade.

A line-up of blanched asparagus adds another dimension of crunch while 48-hour short ribs cooked with the molecular gastronomy technique known as “sous-vide” anchors the sandwich with chewy, meaty texture. Korean BBQ marinade goes a long way in this sandwich, comprising its primary flavors, and with a bit of red pepper paste, the flavors in the sandwich mirror traditional Korean lettuce wraps—ssam.Short rib sandwich ssam 2

Recipe: Korean short rib sandwich ssam

  • 1 strip of 48-hour short rib (recipe here)
  • 2 leaves of Romaine lettuce
  • 2 stalks of asparagus cut into two inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup quinoa
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup Korean BBQ marinade (from 48-hour short rib recipe)
  • 1 tbsp fermented red pepper paste
  1. Cook the 48-hour short ribs using the recipe, or cook short ribs marinated in Korean BBQ marinade on a grill. Cooking the meat sous-vide ensures succulent, soft texture but is not necessary.
  2. Cook the cup of uncooked quinoa in the mixture of water and Korean BBQ marinade. Simmering for about 15 minutes usually does the job.
  3. Place a leaf of Romaine lettuce on a plate.
  4. Smear the red pepper paste on lettuce.
  5. Spread some quinoa on top of the red pepper paste and lettuce.
  6. Set a few pieces of asparagus on the quinoa, leaving space in between each.
  7. Place a strip of short rib on top.
  8. Spread some quinoa, this time, on top of the short rib.
  9. Set a few more pieces of asparagus on the new layer of quinoa as done before.
  10. Cover with a leaf of romaine lettuce.

About Earl

Hi, my name is Earl. I am a student who loves to analyze food and eat healthy. My careful eye for food has caused me to become interested in the science behind food and cooking, and I write about my explorations into food on my website Toastable.com. While I believe in sticking to whole, natural foods, I'm not afraid to work with avant-garde ingredients and equipment such as constant temperature water baths and sodium alginate. I also love photography, technology, and journalism.

22. August 2011 von Earl
Categories: Recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 comments

  • http://facebook Mathias Giermindl

    Hmm Interesting, I am a young an up coming chef from PEI, Canada whom has worked with both Molecular Gastronomy and the practice of making great tasting healthy meals, and in MY opinion that will be an up coming trend in canada soon even not the MG is starting to die down over in Europe.

    • http://toastable.com earl lee

      Thanks for your thoughts. I’m a firm believer in both healthy food and molecular gastronomy and think the two can work well together.