Trattoria Trecolori; Locanda Verde; Miya’s | Toastable | Food, fitness, and tech

Trattoria Trecolori; Locanda Verde; Miya’s

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College has changed my view on money. By that, I mean I’ve become a lot less stringent about the little things, $8 sandwich, $2 coffee, and other similar purchases. I bought my cousin a buffalo chicken sandwich called ‘Wenzel’ a few weeks ago when he came to visit, and after handing him the sandwich, he offered to pay me. During high school, I would have asked out of formalities, “You sure?”, and proceeded to let him pay. Instead, I told him that he had already spent an exorbitant amount of money on cab rides that weekend and the sandwich was on me. I brushed it off and didn’t give a second thought to my actions. I would not say that I am less frugal, though. I still am. I search for the cheapest deals on Amazon, forgo buying items unless I really need them, and take advantage of free meal swipes every weekend, but around friends, I’m a bit more loose with my change. I don’t mind spending money on overpriced breakfast sandwiches if it means I get to go eat with a friend while sharing a mutual frustration over the price of such sandwich. It’s liberating not having to feel a pang of regret after buying some food that I could have otherwise obtained for free at home.

Trattoria Trecolori

Speaking of overpriced food, I ate at a New York City restaurant called Trattoria Trecolori while visiting my friend Brian at Columbia. I realize though, that practically everything in New York City is overpriced. The Chipotle burritos in Manhattan cost nearly a dollar more than those in suburban Maryland, and they taste the same. I’m biased because I’m not a fan of seafood besides salmon, mackerel, scallops, and anchovies, but Trattoria Trecolori’s menu could use some smaller numbers.

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I ordered a risotto with various seafoods incorporated into the mix, and though the fare was okay, I couldn’t help but think about the scallop risotto dish at Cava Mezze I had months earlier. It was cheaper and tastier.

Trattoria Trecolori

Brian and I also shared an $18 appetizer consisting of clam, shrimp, mushrooms, and eggplant. While the eggplant and mushroom pieces were tasty to gnaw on, the price was a bit too high. I didn’t try the clam, but Brian liked them.

Brian

Brian ordered a linguine with clam dish. Simple, but I bet it was refreshingly good.

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Locanda Verde

Locanda Verde

This quaint, high-class restaurant by Andrew Carmellini is a favorite of mine. I love the brunch there—admittedly, I’ve only been to Locanda Verde during brunch hours. Carmellini’s sheep’s milk ricotta with toast transformed my view of what simple ricotta cheese and bread could achieve. The thick, creamy cheese mirrors the texture of Greek yogurt and juggles both sweet and salty. The toast, with its warm, white center and tinged crust, fits perfectly with the ricotta cheese. See my previous, more ornate description below:

Embodying the texture of whipped cream cheese, Carmellini’s ricotta served an addictive accompaniment to toast. Light, truffle honey lay drizzled over the ricotta, and rosemary sprigs graced atop cloud-white cheese. The trio packed a synchronous punch to my taste buds, achieving perfect balance between sweet, savory, and fragrant.The burnt orange toast itself could anchor as a stellar dish. With a crunchy, charred crust invoking robust aromas and an interior soft as plush, Carmellini’s toast certainly does not come from an ordinary toaster oven. A dab of salted butter closes the deal, further elevating flavor profile and winning an uncontested spot as one of my all-time favorite dishes.

I tried a couple new dishes at Locanda Verde this time, the polenta waffle and zucchini frittata. Both continued reflected Carmellini’s extraordinary talent at conjuring up a modern, comforting brunch. The frittata, far from dry, was set to perfection and featured crescendos of buttery, salty flavor from the basil-infused goat cheese topping. Carmellini’s waffle batter resulted in the most delicate, fluffy waffle that succumbed easily to pressure. Though the inside was light as a croissant, the waffle’s outer shell maintained crispiness. Topped with cubed apples and syrup, the waffle left me reminiscing in childhood mornings where I would eat waffles at a dinky diner.

Note: See my earlier review of Locanda Verde.

Miya’s Sushi

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Last but certainly not least, my friend LeRoy brought me to a New Haven restaurant called Miya’s Sushi. The place has won numerous accolades for its food and sustainability practices. Miya’s makes sushi using brown rice and focuses on serving only locally obtained fish. Their principles about food align with mine, which makes dining there a great experience. Honestly, I forgot which dishes I ordered, but they certainly were definitely satisfying. Miya’s runs a little shy on the raw fish to rice ratio—needs more raw fish—but the food tastes great nonetheless. Miya’s also produces unique slices of ginger; they’re thicker than normal ones and have a sweeter flavor.

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Trattoria Trecolori
254 W 47th St
New York, NY 10019
(212) 997-4540

Locanda Verde
377 Greenwich St (between Franklin St & Moore St)
New York, NY 10013
(212) 925-3797

Miya’s Sushi
68 Howe St
New Haven, CT 06511
(203) 777-9760

About Earl

Hi, my name is Earl. I am a student who loves to analyze food and eat healthy. My careful eye for food has caused me to become interested in the science behind food and cooking, and I write about my explorations into food on my website Toastable.com. While I believe in sticking to whole, natural foods, I'm not afraid to work with avant-garde ingredients and equipment such as constant temperature water baths and sodium alginate. I also love photography, technology, and journalism.

30. November 2011 von Earl
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